Should You Get a Paperlike iPad Screen Protector?

Should You Get a Paperlike iPad Screen Protector?

I finally broke down and bought a Paperlike iPad screen protector, partly because people kept asking me if I’d tried it, and partly because I was tired of my hand slipping when I tried to do fine linework or smooth lettering!

I want to give you my honest opinion of the protector so you can decide if it’s right for you. I’ve been using it for the past month, so I’ll tell you about everything from installation to long term use.

Note: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may get a percentage of the purchase price if you buy through my links. This doesn’t increase the cost for the buyer and I only talk about products that I already use and love.

First, you’re probably wondering — does it really feel like paper?

Paperlike is true to it’s name — it really is like drawing on paper (without the shifting and moving that comes with real paper)! So if you like the feeling of drawing on paper, you will probably like the screen protector. It even creates the “pencil on paper sound” when you drag your stylus across the screen. This was hard for me to get used to at first, but now I love it.

Does it actually make drawing easier?

Personally, I have a problem with the Apple pencil slipping on the screen when I am trying to do refined linework or smooth lettering like this:

I also have a problem with my hand getting stuck to the screen if I’m even the least bit warm. Maybe I have naturally sweaty hands, or maybe the chocolate on my hands is making me sticky. Either way, I get stuck to my screen like thighs on a leather couch (yikes!). The Paperlike has definitely improved this for me! I feel like I can glide my stylus and hand across the screen much more easily than before.

Does it work well with apps other than Procreate?

Honestly, I’ve seen the biggest difference in the Goodnotes app. I love Goodnotes, but I hate their handwriting recognition. It is way too hard to get smooth lines and it never looks like my handwriting does on paper! The Paperlike helped considerably with this by reducing the little “flicks” that you get after finishing a word (Goodnotes users know what I’m talking about).

Does it damage your Apple Pencil nib?

I’ve been using the Paperlike screen protector for about a month and can’t see any damage to my Apple Pencil nib.

Does it make it hard to see the screen?

I have noticed a slight “dulling” of the appearance of the screen, but I wouldn’t say it’s harder to see, just different. It’s a little less shiny, so images look more like they will when printed onto paper, which I think makes it easier to prepare for printing. And honestly I think we could all use a little less bright light shining in our eyes with all the screentime we get. Am I right??

Only some of the pictures in this post show my iPad with a screen protector on it. Can you tell the difference? Neither can I.

So, should I get one?

After using the Paperlike for a month, I am hooked. I definitely wouldn’t go back to a “naked screen”. My favorite part of the Paperlike is that it creates a slight resistance between the screen and pencil, just like real paper does. So it’s easier to control your strokes and get smooth lines.

What should I know before buying one?

1) Double, triple, and quadruple check your iPad model before ordering. If you order the wrong model, the screen protector won’t fit over the button/lack of button on your iPad.

2) Watch the installation video before installing (you’ll get the video link in the package). Us normal people are not qualified to install the screen protector without training. Don’t attempt it!

3) Clean the screen VERY well before installing. I didn’t do this the first time, and the result was bubbles in the film. So I had to re-install with my back-up screen protector. Don’t be lazy like me and not clean your screen well! All the things you need to clean the screen are contained in the package.

Order a Paperlike Screen Protector

More Questions?

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